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2 edition of cloning and characterisation of the stigmatic self-incompatibility (S-) gene from Papaver rhoeas L. found in the catalog.

cloning and characterisation of the stigmatic self-incompatibility (S-) gene from Papaver rhoeas L.

Humphrey C. C. . Foote

cloning and characterisation of the stigmatic self-incompatibility (S-) gene from Papaver rhoeas L.

by Humphrey C. C. . Foote

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Published by University of Birmingham in Birmingham .
Written in English


Edition Notes

Thesis (Ph.D) - University of Birmingham, School of Biological Sciences, 1994.

Statementby Humphrey Charles Craig Foote.
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL20915469M

You can write a book review and share your experiences. Other readers will always be interested in your opinion of the books you've read. Whether you've loved the book or not, if you give your honest and detailed thoughts then people will find new books that are right for them.,, Free ebooks since obligatory xenogamy associated to self-incompatibility, thus allowing variations in the transition between autogamy and allogamy (Iuchi & Lopes ). Decades ago, Passiflora species were primarily considered xenogamous, conditioned by self-incompatibility (Semir & Brown ). Nowadays, there are reports of self-compatibility in.

Full text of "Desert Plants Biology & Biotechnology" See other formats.   In Lilium longiflorum pollination, growing pollen tubes utilize two critical mechanisms, adhesion and chemotropism, for directional growth to the ovules. Among several molecular factors discovered in the past decade, two small, secreted cysteine-rich proteins have been shown to play major roles in pollen tube adhesion and reorientation bioassays: Cited by:

Full text of "Anther and pollen [electronic resource]: from biology to biotechnology" See other formats. You can write a book review and share your experiences. Other readers will always be interested in your opinion of the books you've read. Whether you've loved the book or not, if you give your honest and detailed thoughts then people will find new books that are right for them.


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Cloning and characterisation of the stigmatic self-incompatibility (S-) gene from Papaver rhoeas L by Humphrey C. C. . Foote Download PDF EPUB FB2

This paper reports the development of an in vitro bioassay for the stigmatic product of the self-incompatibility gene in Papaver rhoeas L. As with in vivo pollinations, inhibition of pollen tube growth occurs only when the S-alleles carried by the pollen are matched by those contained in the stigma used to make a print or from whichCited by:   Self-incompatibility (SI) prevents the production of “self” seed and inbreeding by providing a recognition and rejection system for “self,” or genetically identical, pollen.

Studies of gametophytic SI (GSI) species at a molecular level have identified two completely different S-genes and SI mechanisms. One GSI mechanism, which is found in the Solanaceae, Rosaceae Cited by: Summary. The roles played by stigmatic glycoproteins in the self-incompatibility (SI) mechanism in Brassica oleracea have been investigated.

In a physiological study, the suppression of protein synthesis was demonstrated to overcome SI, but also affect a number of other pollination-related events, such as regulated hydration of the pollen : H. Dickinson, M. Crabbe. Thus, the indexes of self-incompatibility For the white- and yellow-flowered forms of C bletioides, C galeata, C crispa, and C chrysantha, were, andrespectively.

self-incompatibility: the Solanaceae, Papaveraceae and Brassicaceae self-incompatibility systems. Figure 1. Gametophytic and sporophytic self-incompatibility in flowering plants. (A) In gametophytic self-incompatibility, the phenotype of the pollen is File Size: KB.

Self-incompatibility (SI) is a general name for several genetic mechanisms in angiosperms, which prevent self-fertilization and thus encourage outcross and should not be confused with genetically controlled physical or temporal mechanisms that prevent self-pollination, such as heterostyly and sequential hermaphroditism (dichogamy).

In plants with SI, when a pollen. Abstract:Self-incompatibility, is a genetically controlled mechanism for rejection of own pollen.

It has been a favourite topic for botanists and geneticists since Darwin who first discussed this phenomenon and suggested its central significance during the evolution of flowering Size: KB.

Goals / Objectives Determine which combinations of S-haplotypes result in self-incompatibility and self-compatibility in tetraploid sour cherry. Determine the structural changes associated with the non-functional S-haplotypes.

Develop molecular markers that can be used in a breeding program to identify self-compatible progeny at the seedling stage. Characterization of the SP11/SCR High-Affinity Binding Site Involved in Self/Nonself Recognition in Brassica Self-Incompatibility Hiroko Shimosato,a Naohiko Yokota,a Hiroshi Shiba,a Megumi Iwano,a Tetsuyuki Entani,a Fang-Sik Che,a,b Masao Watanabe,c Akira Isogai,a and Seiji Takayamaa,1 a Graduate School of Biological Sciences, Nara Institute of Science and Cited by: Self-incompatibility (SI) involves the recognition and rejection of self or genetically identical pollen.

Gametophytic SI is probably the most widespread of the SI systems and, so far, two. 16 MECHANISM OF SELF INCOMPATIBILITY There are two different types of events which are considered to constitute the basis of self incompatibility system: (1) The stimulation of unlike genotypes and (2) The inhibition of like genotypes.

Thus two hypotheses have been proposed to explain the mechanism of self incompatibility in plants. Self-incompatibility (SI) is the major outcrossing mechanism in the family Brassicaceae (de Nettancourt, ). Species in this family have been grouped into 19 tribes on the basis of morphological criteria (Schultz, ), and SI has been described in all tribes analyzed to date.

When Bateman () surveyed species distributed in 11 Cited by:   The presence of a stigmatic membrane was observed by Elliott 2 in L. tenuis and by Giles 3 in L. corniculatus. Giles 3 was unable to observe any difference in germination between self- and cross. Self-incompatibility in Brassicaceae is determined by the interaction between S-Locus Protein 11 (SP11) on the pollen and S-receptor kinase (SRK) in the from heterozygotes generally displays products of both SP11 alleles, but in some heterozygotes SP11 expression is monoallelic, with one allele (SP11 R) being silenced by promoter by: Self infertility or SI is a genetically controlled cell-cell recognition system that acts as a barrier to self fertilization in a wide range of flowering plants or angiosperms.

It is defined as the inability of the plant producing functional gametes to set seed upon self pollination. Molecular genetics of self-incompatibility. In the Brassicaceae, the self-incompatibility phenotype of both stigma and pollen is determined sporophytically by the diploid S-locus genotype of the parent plant and dominance relationships between S-locus variants are observed in both stigma and pollen (Thompson and Taylor ).Pollen inhibition at the Cited by: Cloning and sequencing of DNA fragments of the S-locus regions.

Genomic DNAs of the S-7, S, and S homozygotes in B. oleracea and of the S homozygote in B. rapa were partially digested by Sau3AI and ligated to the arms of a λ-phage, λFIXII (Stratagene, La Jolla, CA).Clones of the S-locus regions were isolated by plaque hybridization using specific by: called the pollen self-incompatibility or Sp gene.

To identify possible candidates for this gene, we investigated the genomic structure of the S locus in Antirrhinum, a member of the Scrophulariaceae. A novel F-box gene, AhSLF-S2, encoded by the S2 allele, with the expected features of the Sp gene was identified. AhSLF-S2 is located 9 kb.

F1: Genetic control of self-incompatibility (SI). When allelic forms (haplotypes) of the S locus are matched in pollen (male tissue) and pistil (female tissue) the pollen is rendered incompatible. The incompatibility response is mediated by a variety of molecular mechanisms in different species.

In Solanaceae, the self-incompatibility S-RNase and S -locus F-box interactions define self-pollen recognition and rejection in an S -specific manner. This interaction triggers a cascade of events involving other gene products unlinked to the S -locus that are crucial to the self-incompatibility response.

To date, two essential pistil-modifier genes, K and High Top Cited by:. 1. Introduction. Self-incompatibility (SI) is a widespread genetic mechanism in many species of flowering plants that prevents inbreeding by promoting most cases, SI systems are controlled by a single multi-allelic locus called the S-locus, which comprises male- and female-specific determinants (pollen-S and pistil-S, respectively).

Cited by: 7.Curriculum vitae. Noni Franklin-Tong, March Name: edited a book. on self-incompatibility; this is the first monograph on this topic for 30 years. I have 12 chapters in books and F.C.H. () Recombinant stigmatic self-incompatibility (S-) protein elicits a Ca2+ transient in pollen of Papaver rhoeas.

The Plant Journal 8,   Two low-molecular-weight proteins have been purified from Brassica napus pollen and a gene corresponding to one of them has been isolated. The gene encodes an kD protein with two EF-hand calcium-binding motifs and is a member of a small gene family in B.

napus. The protein is part of a family of pollen allergens recently identified in several evolutionarily distant .